Dementia Care Education & Consulting from Beatitudes Campus

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Comfort Matters is a dementia care education and research program dedicated to improving the quality of care and life for people with dementia.

Course Instruction

Health care staff and medical care providers study Comfort Matters courses through live instruction by experienced health care instructors, web-based instruction by these same instructors or a combination of the two. A specially designed booklet that contains a content outline, print resource materials, and self-checking exercises guides instruction  in each course. The same booklets are used in both live and web-based instruction.

Whenever instruction is live, the instructor presents information and engages staff in discussions using these materials. If instruction is web-based, staff-medical care providers participate in webinars or power point presentations accompanied by spoken information and videos. Webinar instructors direct participants to specific pages in the booklets to see important points.

Health care personnel use the booklets also for note-taking and for information about evaluation of their progress in meeting course objectives. Each course booklet features a section For Additional Information that provides annotated references that can add to their knowledge and understanding.

Comfort Matters Course References

Brain deterioration due to Alzheimer’s Disease
National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health. (n. d.) Retrieved March 18, 2014 from http://www.nia.nih.gov/newsroom/resources/images-and-video.
Changes in memory, thinking, and function in dementia
Hospice of the Valley, 2006; revised 2012.
Common dementia-related behaviors in the progression of the disease
Hospice of the Valley, 2006.
Comfort matters for people with dementia
Hubbard, G., Cook, A., Tester, S., & Downs, M. (2002). Beyond words: Older people with dementia using and interpreting nonverbal behavior. Journal of Aging Studies, 16(2), 155-167.
Kitwood, T. (1997). The experience of dementia. Aging & Mental Health,  1(1), 13-22.
Kolcaba, K. Y. (1994). A theory of holistic comfort for nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing,19(6), 1178-1184.
March, A., & McCormack, D. (2009). Nursing theory-directed healthcare: Modifying Kolcaba’s comfort theory as an institution-wide approach, Holistic Nursing Practice, 23(2), 75-80.
Medical and palliative care models
Fox, E. (1997). Predominance of the curative model of medical care: A residual problem. Journal of the American Medical Association, 278(9), 761-764. Retrieved June 19, 2015 from http://www.fammed.washington.edu/palliativecare/requirements/FOV1-00015079/PCvCC.htm?FCItem=S00D339AE?WasRead=1
Jerant, A. F., Azari, R. S., Nesbitt, T. S., & Meyers, F. J. (2004). The TLC model of palliative care in the elderly: Preliminary application in the assisted living setting. Annals of Family Medicine,2(1), 54-60. Retrieved July 16, 2015 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1466621/.
Login, C. C. (2012). Palliative care: A multidisciplinary approach. European Journal of Science and Theology, 8(2), 61-69. Retrieved June 19, 2015 from http://www.ejst.tuiasi.ro/Files/33/Login%20%287%29.pdf.
Consistent assignment staffing for comfort care
Illinois Foundation for Quality Health Care. (n.d.). Change ideas for consistent assignment. Retrieved June 30, 2016 from https://afmc.org/aippdocs/cchome/library/Change%20Ideas%20-%20Consistent%20Assignment.pdf
Advancing Excellence in America’s Nursing Homes. (n.d.). Increasing use of consistent assignment. Retrieved June 30, 2016 from https://www.nhqualitycampaign.org/files/factsheets/Staff%20Fact%20Sheet%20-%20Consistent%20Assignment.pdf
Advancing Excellence in America’s Nursing Homes. (2016). Consistent assignment. Retrieved June 25, 2016 from https://www.nhqualitycampaign.org/goalDetail.aspx?g=ca.
Farrell, D., & Frank, B. (2007, July). A keystone for excellence. Provider: Long Term & Post-Acute Care. Retrieved July 25, 2016 from http://www.fhca.org/members/qi/culture/keystone.pdf
Definitions of key concepts
Martin, G. A., Sgrillo, J., & Horton, A. (2011). Personhood. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh (Eds.), Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia: Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 43-53). NY: Springer.
Martin, G. A., & McCarthy, M. (2011). Managing behavior problems associated with advanced dementia. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh (Eds.). Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia: Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 65-81). NY: Springer.
Lindstrom, K. B., Bosch, R., Cohen, R. M., & 9 additional authors. (2011). Caregiving. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh (Eds.). Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia: Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 25-40). NY: Springer.
State of Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services Division of Elder and Disability Services. (2006). Person-directed dementia care assessment tool: A guide for creating quality of life and successfully refocusing behavior for people with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia in long term care settings, III. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from http://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/publications/P2/p20084.pdf
Caspar, S., & O’Rourke, N. (2011). Measurement of workplace empowerment across caregivers. Geriatric Nursing, 32, 156-165.
Cultural competence: Definition, requirements, and importance
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. (2015, March 25).Cultural competency. Retrieved August 9, 2015 from http://www.nih.gov/clearcommunication/culturalcompetency.htm.
Adapted from Alzheimer’s Association. (n.d.). Cultural competence. Retrieved August 9, 2015 from http://www.alz.org/Resources/Diversity/downloads/GEN_EDU-10steps.pdf
What caregivers should know about persons with dementia
Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2013.
What caregivers should know about families
Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2013.
Notes for thinking about cultural diversity
De Vera, N., Beardsley, M., Chartrand, H., & 9 additional authors. (2011). Cultural diversity. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh (Eds.). Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia:Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 173-180, 188-193, 196-225). New York: Springer.
Steps toward culturally sensitive dementia care
Alzheimer’s Association. (n. d.). Cultural competence. Retrieved August 9, 2015 from http://www.alz.org/Resources/Diversity/downloads/GEN_EDU-10steps.pdf
Competencies for job roles
Alonzo, T., & Long, C. O. (2007). 1:1 Peer training: Direct care experience & competencies. Palliative Care for Advanced Dementia: A Model Teaching Unit. Unpublished manuscript.
Facilitators, core- and neighborhood teams, meeting procedures
Alonzo, T. (2014) Essential elements of staff meetings: The Beatitudes Model: Training booklet.
Staff empowerment
Laschinger, H. K. S., Finegan, J. E., Shamian, J., & Wilk, P. (2004). A longitudinal analysis of the impact of workplace empowerment on work satisfaction. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25, 527-545.
Common dementia-related behaviors in the progression of the disease
Hospice of the Valley, 2006
Changes in memory, thinking, and function in dementia
Hospice of the Valley, 2006; revised 2012
What caregivers should know about persons with dementia
Beatitudes Campus 2007; revised 2013.
Basic approaches to caregiving for persons with dementia
Martin, G. A., & McCarthy, M. (2011). Managing behavior problems associated with advanced dementia. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh (Eds.), Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia: Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 65-81). New York: Springer.
Dementia-friendly milieus
Martin, G. A., Sgrillo, J., & Horton, A. (2011). Creating the optimal milieu for care. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh   (Eds.), Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia: Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 55-64). New York: Springer.
I-Care plan for resists care-service
I-Care plans,  Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2015
Components of I-Care plans
Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2013.
Challenges to pain assessment in dementia
End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium. (2010). Pain assessment and management, Module 2, pages M2-7 and M2-8.
Steps in making a pain assessment
Herr, K., Coyne, P. J., McCaffrey, M., Manworren, R., & Merkel, S. (2011). Pain assessment in the patient unable to self-report: Position statement with clinical practice recommendations. Retrieved June 20, 2015 from http://www.aspmn.org/documents/PainAssessmentinthePatientUnabletoSelfReport.pdf
Faces Pain Scale Revised (FPS-R)
Hicks, CL, von Baeyer, CL, Spafford P, van Korlaar I, Goodenough B. Faces Pain Scale-Revised:Toward a Common Metric     in Pediatric Pain Measurement. PAIN 2001; 93:173-183.
Pain Thermometer Scale
Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, AGSF, The University of Iowa, College of Nursing.
Pain location chart
Beatitudes Campus, 1999.
PAINAD Scale: Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia
Warden,V., Hurley, A. C., & Volicer, L. (2003). Development and psychometric evaluation of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) Scale. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 4(1),
Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators
Feldt, K. S. (2000). The checklist of nonverbal pain indicators (CNPI). Pain Management Nursing, 1(1), 13-21.
Examples of goals and outcomes for pain management
I-Care Plans, Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2015.
Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management
End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium. (2010). Pain assessment and management: Module 2, pages M2-76 through M2-96.
Steps in pharmacologic interventions to address pain
Long, C. O., & Morgan, B. (2008). Pain management. The resource guide for home health care and hospice nurses. Baltimore, MD: Hopkins Educational Resources.
Kovach, C. R., Noonan, P. E., Schlidt, A. M., Reynolds, S., & Wells, T. (2006). The serial trial intervention: An innovative approach to meeting needs of individuals with dementia. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 32(4), 18-25.
Medications for pain according to its intensity levels
WHO Pain and Palliative Care Communications Program. (2006). Cancer Pain Release. Retrieved August 7, 2014 from: http://www.geriatricpain.org/Content/Management/Interventions/Documents/WHO%20ladder.pdf
I-Care Plan for Acute Pain Management
I-Care Plan for Chronic Pain Management
I-Care Plans, Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2015.
PAINAD item definitions
Warden,V., Hurley, A. C., & Volicer, L. (2003). Development and psychometric evaluation of the Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) Scale. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 4(1), 9-15.
Pain management policy and procedures
Beatitudes Campus, Policies and procedures, 2007; revised, 2014.
Changes in memory, thinking, and function in dementia
Hospice of the Valley, 2006; revised 2012.
Sensory experiences
Cohen-Mansfield, J., Libin, A., & Marx, M. S. (2007). Nonpharmacological treatment of agitation: A controlled trial of         systematic individualized intervention. Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 68(8),   908-916.
Kverno, K. S., Black, B. S., Nolan, M. T., & Rabins, P. V. (2009). Research on treating neuropsychiatric symptoms of          advanced dementia with non-pharmacological strategies, 1998-2008: A systematic literature review. International             Psychogeriatrics/IPA, 21(5), 825-843.
What caregivers should know about persons with dementia
Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2013.
I-Care plan for making connections
I-Care Plans, Beatitudes Campus, 2007; revised 2015.
The change processes
Sowell, E. J. (2005). Curriculum: An integrative introduction (3rd edition, pp. 10-16). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Vision and mission statements: Meanings and examples
Alzheimer’s Association. Desert Southwest Chapter. About Our Chapter. (2014). Retrieved March 12, 2014 from http://www.alz.org/dsw/in_my_community_about.asp
Vermilion Cliffs. Beatitudes Campus, 2006.
Choices in care models
Fox, E. (1997). Predominance of the curative model of medical care: A residual problem. Journal of the American Medical Association, 278(9), 761-764. Retrieved June 19, 2015 from http://www.fammed.washington.edu/palliativecare/requirements/FOV1-00015079/PCvCC.htm?FCItem=S00D339AE?WasRead=1
Jerant, A. F., Azari, R. S., Nesbitt, T. S., & Meyers, F. J. (2004). The TLC model of palliative care in the elderly: Preliminary application in the assisted living setting. Annals of Family Medicine, 2(1), 54-60. Retrieved July 16, 2015 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1466621/.
Login, C. C. (2012). Palliative care: A multidisciplinary approach. European Journal of Science and Theology, 8(2), 61-69. Retrieved June 19, 2015 from http://www.ejst.tuiasi.ro/Files/33/Login%20%287%29.pdf
Dementia-friendly milieus
Martin, G. A., Sgrillo, J., & Horton, A. (2011). Creating the optimal milieu for care. In G. A. Martin & M. N. Sabbagh           (Eds.), Palliative care for advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia: Guidelines and standards for evidence-based care (pp. 55-    64). New York: Springer.
Vision and mission statements: Three types of organizations
Comprehensive Hospice and Palliative Care. (2013). Retrieved March 15, 2014 from http://chpchospice.com/chpc-mission/.
Alzheimer’s Association. Desert Southwest Chapter. About Our Chapter. (2014). Retrieved March 12, 2014 from http://www.alz.org/dsw/in_my_community_about.asp.
Vermilion Cliffs. Beatitudes Campus, 2006.
Basic ideas in consensus decision-making
Consensus decision-making: How to use consensus process (n. d.) Retrieved March 12, 2014 from http://www.consensusdecisionmaking.org/.